31st Annual Razzie Awards: Nominations

Worst Picture

  • The Bounty Hunter
  • Sex & The City 2
  • The Last Airbender
  • Vampires Suck
  • The Twilight Saga: Eclipse

Worst Actor

  • Jack Black (Gulliver’s Travels)
  • Gerard Butler (The Bounty Hunter)
  • Ashton Kutcher (Killers/Valentine’s Day)
  • Taylor Lautner (The Twilight Saga: Eclipse)
  • Robert Pattinson (The Twilight Saga: Eclipse)

Worst Actress

  • Jennifer Aniston (The Bounty Hunter/The Switch)
  • Miley Cyrus (The Last Song)
  • Megan Fox (Jonah Hex)
  • Kristen Stewart (The Twilight Saga: Eclipse)
  • Sarah Jessica Parker, Kim Cattrall, Kristin Davis & Cynthia Nixon (Sex & The City 2)

Worst Supporting Actor

  • Billy Ray Cyrus (The Spy Next Door)
  • Dev Patel (The Last Airbender)
  • George Lopez (Marmaduke/The Spy Next Door/Valentine’s Day)
  • Jackson Rathbone (The Last Airbender/The Twilight Saga: Eclipse)
  • Rob Schneider (Grown Ups)

Worst Supporting Actress

  • Jessica Alba (Machete/Little Fockers/The Killer Inside Me/Valentine’s Day
  • Cher (Burlesque)
  • Liza Minnelli (Sex & The City 2)
  • Nicola Peltz (The Last Airbender)
  • Barbara Streisand (Little Fockers)

Worst Eye-Gouging Use Of 3D

  • Saw 3D
  • Clash Of The Titans
  • The Last Airbender
  • Nutcracker 3D
  • Cats & Dogs 2: Revenge Of Kitty Galore

Worst Screen Couple/Ensemble

  • Jennifer Aniston & Gerard Butler (The Bounty Hunter)
  • Josh Brolin & Megan Fox (Jonah Hex)
  • The Entire Cast Of Sex & The City 2
  • The Entire Cast Of The Last Airbender
  • The Entire Cast Of The Twilight Saga: Eclipse

Worst Director

  • Jason Friedman & Aaron Seltzer (Vampires Suck)
  • Michael Patrick King (Sex & The City 2)
  • M. Night Shyamalan (The Last Airbender)
  • David Slade (The Twilight Saga: Eclipse)
  • Sylvester Stalone (The Expendables)

Worst Screenplay

  • The Last Airbender (M. Night Shyamalan)
  • Little Fockers (John Hamburg & Larry Stuckey)
  • Sex & The City 2 (Michael Patrick King)
  • The Twilight Saga: Eclipse (Melissa Rosenberg)
  • Vampires Suck (Jason Friedman & Aaron Seltzer)

Worst Prequel, Remake, Rip-Off Or Sequel

  • Clash Of The Titans
  • The Last Airbender
  • Sex & The City 2
  • The Twilight Saga: Eclipse
  • Vampires Suck

DVD Releases: January 17, 2011

The Hole 3D

Director – Joe Dante

Starring – Chris Massoglia, Haley Bennett and Nathan Gamble

Dinner For Schmucks

Director – Jay Roach

Starring – Steve Carell, Paul Rudd and Stephanie Szostak

Grown Ups

Director – Dennis Dugan

Starring – Adam Sandler, Salma Hayek and Kevin James

The Switch

Director – Josh Gordon and Will Speck

Starring – Jennifer Aniston, Jason Bateman and Patrick Wilson

Why Did I Get Married Too?

Director – Tyler Perry

Starring – Janet Jackson, Tyler Perry and Jill Scott

Certified Copy

Director – Abbas Kiarostam

Starring – Juliette Binoche, William Shimell and Jean-Claude Carrière

Cake Eaters

Director – Mary Stuart Masterson

Starring – Kristen Stewart, Jayce Bartok and Bruce Dern


Director – Colm McCarthy

Starring – James Nesbitt, Kate Dickie and Karen Gillan


Director – Anurag Basu

Starring – Hrithik Roshan, Bárbara Mori and Luce Rains

Review: The Switch (2010)

Originally titled The Baster, The Switch is an indie romantic-drama from the mind of Allan Loeb, who previously wrote screenplay’s for Things We Lost in the Fire and 21, and is loosely based on a short story by Jeffrey Eugenides.

The film centers on the overly anxious, perplexing and irritating Wally, who’s unmarried 40-year-old best friend, Kassie (Aniston), turns to a turkey baster in order to become pregnant. After moving to Michigan to raise her child, Kassie returns and reunites with Wally, who has been living with a secret: he replaced her preferred sperm sample with his own.

The Switch, which most would label as a female-centred rom-com, instead switches the focus onto the male’s point-of-view. It ponders serious, life-changing questions about pregnancy and fatherhood, in a heartfelt and humorous way. Bateman plays the role of Wally perfectly, highlighting his charming, wry personality in an endearing and well-natured way, showing Bateman has what it takes to carry a high-profile comedy film.

Aniston, in a much-welcomed departure from her previous films, holds her own, providing an appealing, yet restrained performance as a single mother, letting audiences see why she was Hollywood’s sweetheart in the first place. Jeff Goldbum and Juliette Lewis shine in their limited roles, each embodying their characters to the best of their ability, while never outshining the central leads.

Despite the source material being predictable, and the sometimes cringeworthy dialogue, the directors – Will Speck and Josh Gordon – manage to keep the film on track, heading toward an ultimate goal, maintaining the message throughout and never letting the films throwaway moments overshadow the light-hearted, rather brilliant ones that some critics seem to be ignoring.

The Switch may not break any boundaries, or attract a particularly wide audience, but it’s surprisingly funny and sufficiently light-hearted take on an often bland genre. Bateman proves himself as a male lead, while Aniston proves there’s more to her acting range than silly, generic comedies.