Review: Big Eyes (2014)

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In a welcome change of direction, Tim Burton downplays his typically outlandish style for Big Eyes, a sunny and well mounted, yet disappointingly thin 1960s biopic. Wannabe artist Margaret Keane (Amy Adams) up sticks and moves to San Fransisco, where she soon falls for Walter (Christoph Waltz). But when Walter starts to pass off her paintings as his own, making thousands in the process, things soon turn sour.  Continue reading “Review: Big Eyes (2014)”

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Review: American Hustle (2013)

American Hustle

The third part in his own self-proclaimed reinvention (one that’s so far brought with it The Fighter and Silver Linings Playbook, two Academy Award winners), American Hustle finds David O. Russell at his most playful, tackling the infamous ABSCAM scandal – a hugely publicised FBI sting into political corruption – with a tremendous amount of wit, vigour and vibrancy. While certainly not without its faults, it’s a film that’s more often than not massively entertaining, and a constant platform for spectacular performances and outlandish 70s fashion. Continue reading “Review: American Hustle (2013)”

Amy Adams In Talks For Dark Places

Amy Adams (Junebug) is in negotiations to star in mystery-thriller Dark Places, a big screen adaptation of Gillian Flynn’s 2009 novel of the same name, Variety has reported.

The actress, who has been nominated for three Academy Awards, will play Libby (Adams), a woman who, twenty five years after surviving the massacre of her Continue reading “Amy Adams In Talks For Dark Places”

Review: The Muppets (2011)

Over a decade since their last cinematic outing (the uneven Muppets From Space), The Muppets return to familiar territory with the aid of self-proclaimed enthusiast Jason Segel and director James Bobin. Using their absence as the central premise, what develops is a sweet story about reconciliation, friendship and love, with a hefty dose of the laughter and self-referential awareness that entirely encapsulates what makes The Muppets so special.

Walter (voiced by Peter Linz) is the world’s biggest Muppets fan. After being invited on a trip to Los Angeles with best friend Gary (Segel) and Gary’s doting Continue reading “Review: The Muppets (2011)”

Review: The Fighter (2010)

David O. Russell’s new film, The Fighter, is about a dysfunctional family based on the boxer Mickey Ward’s turbulent life.

The Fighter tells the story of boxer “Irish” Micky Ward’s (Mark Wahlberg) who’s attempts at a boxing career are always met with failure. Trained by his drug-addicted brother, Dicky, and managed by their manipulative mother, Alice, Micky struggles to escape his tight-knit family and carve a successful life of his own.

Dicky’s dramatic fall from grace and the fractured shards of his dysfunctional family spur Micky forward, tearing him down, yet building him up at the same time, leading him to girlfriend Charlene and a career-move to LA.

Shepherded by Wahlberg’s Micky and Bale’s Dicky, The Fighter builds its dynamic around the family, choosing to focus on the families relationship, rivalry and manipulation, rather than the boxing itself, which is seen as a form of escapism, for Micky in particular.

Wahlberg and Bale each inhabit their respective characters absolutely, their personaes played against one another to represent two brothers struggling against the odds to make a name for themselves in the world.

Amy Adams embodies Charlene with a magnificently arresting force, striving to free Micky from the cycle of exploitation and anxiousness he’s been stuck in for years, allowing him to reach his full potential.

Melissa Leo is boorish in her rendering of Alice; exploiting and disrupting Micky and Dicky’s quest for stardom and freedom as mother/manager Alice. She’s one of those women from hell, all cigarettes and chicanery.

Russell’s direction is wonderful, mixing docu-style with intense, evasive cinematography, constructing everything with a perfect sense of naturalism and vivid energy.

Disappointedly, the script doesn’t, at times, match up to the strength of the direction and performances. It fails to find the right balance between boxing film and family psychodrama, making it difficult for viewers to fully invest in the characters’ lives; never quite reaches the heights its premise is destined for.

The Fighter is a well-directed, powerful film, with some truly sublime performances, regretfully let down by an often poor and in-cohesive script.