Review: The Rover (2014)

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Guy Pearce proves his chops once more in The Rover, David Michôd’s effectively dressed, yet ultimately prosaic post-apocalyptic revenge thriller. In the rough outback, Eric (Pearce), a ruthless loner, undertakes a chase across the outback when two thugs steal his car, crossing paths with one of the thieves’ brothers (Robert Pattinson) in the process. Continue reading “Review: The Rover (2014)”

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EIFF 2013 Review: Breathe In (2013)

Breathe In

The 67th Edinburgh International Film Festival opened softly last night with relationship drama Breathe In. Reuniting blossoming British actress Felicity Jones with writer and director Drake Doremus, whose last feature Like Crazy deservedly scooped the Grand Jury Prize at the 2011 Sundance Film Festival, Breathe In may feel and look like a more adult effort, yet is ultimately depreciated by clichéd character stereotypes and a lack of believability. Continue reading “EIFF 2013 Review: Breathe In (2013)”

Review: Iron Man 3 (2013)

Iron Man 3

Tying up the trilogy, and picking up soon after the events depicted in last year’s The Avengers, Iron Man 3 is arguably the best instalment in the Marvel superhero series, with new director Shane Black – who also co-wrote the script with Drew Pearce – bringing his own trademark mix of dark humour and harsh realism to an already well-oiled and successful machine. Continue reading “Review: Iron Man 3 (2013)”

New Prometheus Trailer Crashes Online

20th Century Fox have put out another, slightly longer trailer for their upcoming summer blockbuster Prometheus – and it has all the necessary ingredients and more to leave you speechless with a body and mind coated in goosebumps.

Boasting a high profile cast, including Noomi Rapace, Charlize Theron, Michael Fassbender, Idris Elba, Guy Pearce and Logan Marshall Green, Prometheus is directed by Ridley Scott, the world class storyteller and visionary responsible for Continue reading “New Prometheus Trailer Crashes Online”

Review: Animal Kingdom (2010)

Animal Kingdom is an astounding, brooding and wonderfully measured Australian crime drama marking the directorial debut of writer-director David Michod.

The film centres on 17-year-old Joshua (James Frecheville) as he is thrown into the deep end forced to move in with his grandmother, Smurf (Jacki Weaver), and her three sons, Pope (Ben Mendelsohn), Craig (Sullivan Stapleton) and Darren (Luke Ford).

Joshua, or J as he’s referred to, is inevitably implicated into the Cody families nasty, nihilistic crime syndicate. His initiation itself is one of the most powerful scenes of the film, perfectly shot and illustrated, deepening the grip the film so expertly implants over the viewers.

Michod invites the audience into the Cody household, opening viewers’ eyes to a world of gritty, nasty and terrifyingly nerve-wracking violence. It’s a very powerful depiction, one that’s not been so masterfully achieved since Goodfellas or Scarface.

Natural, low-key lighting and obtrusive, yet restrained camera angles help to build, and maintain, the overall intensity and realistic nature of the film, never letting it slip into the artificial feel of most modern-day Hollywood crime films.

Each actor, Joel Edgerton and Guy Pearce in particular, provides a taut, emotive performance, effectively playing off one another to establish Animal Kingdom as a truly harrowing portrayal of underbelly life, one that deserves to be recognised for many years to come.

Review: The King’s Speech (2010)

Tom Hooper returns to the period drama genre with The King’s Speech, a subtly told tale of life-long struggles and friendship, set during the build-up to World War II.

The King’s Speech tells the story of King George VI (Colin Firth) who, after his brother abdicates the throne, reluctantly becomes king. Plagued by a stammer, George and his wife Elizabeth (Helena Bonham Carter) enlist the help of unorthodox speech therapist Lionel Logue (Geoffrey Rush).

From here, as the characters battle through countless speech sessions, comic fights and heartfelt exchanges, the film builds to a excellent, adrenaline-pumping crescendo, George VI’s first war-time speech.

Firth’s performance as King George VI is remarkable. Not only is he able to portray the character with conviction and believability, but he acquires the stammer as though he’s been plagued with it himself his whole life.

Rush and Carter bring comedy to the film, lifting the tone from morbid period drama to a rousing, and uplifting tale, each holding their own opposite the masterful Firth.

Each of the three actors here should be guaranteed plenty of award nominations, in particular Firth, who has again proved himself as one of Britain’s finest actors.

In addition to the three central leads, there is strong support from Timothy Spall as Winston Churchill, Michael Gambon as King George V and Guy Pearce as King Edward VIII.

Hooper handles the material with care and style, producing a clever, humorous and emotional film that will have leave you lost for words.

A must see, by all accounts.