Review: Before I Go To Sleep (2014)

739d0b7d-14df-435d-a0fe-0060e6f09d62_zps677bb256In what can only be described as a superficial melodrama that squanders the talents of its A-list cast and marks another lacklustre effort for director Rowan Joffe., Before I Go To Sleep – an adaptation of S. J. Watson’s bestselling novel – stars Christine (Nicole Kidman) as a woman who wakes up every day with no recollection of the day before after an accident left her with severe amnesia. Continue reading “Review: Before I Go To Sleep (2014)”

Advertisements

Review: Devil’s Knot (2013)

Devil's Knot

Canadian director Atom Egoyan’s attempts to dramatise Mara Leveritt’s novelisation of the previously well-documented story of The West Memphis Three is an unfortunately dull, melodramatic and calculable procedural. When three boys disappear, only to be found brutally murdered days later, the authorities’ hold three satanic cult members – Damien (James Hamrick), Jessie (Kristopher Higgins) and Jason (Seth Meriwether) – accountable, even though the evidence isn’t all there. Continue reading “Review: Devil’s Knot (2013)”

Review: Gambit (2012)

Art curator Harry Dean (Colin Firth) hatches a plan to manipulate his boss, cantankerous billionaire Lionel Shahbandar (Alan Rickman), into acquiring a fake Monet painting. Enlisting the help of rambunctious rodeo queen PJ Puznowski (Cameron Diaz) and talented painter and lifelong friend Major Wingate (Tom Courtenay), Harry’s plan seems foolproof. That is, however, until he starts to develop feelings for PJ, causing his plan to dissever in some unexpected and Continue reading “Review: Gambit (2012)”

Review: Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy (2011)

Awards season enters its prime with the long-awaited release of Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy, a new cinematic adaptation of John Le Carré’s acclaimed spy thriller of the same name.

Entrenched in the mid-1970’s, George Smiley (Gary Oldman) is pressured from semi-retirement by Control (John Hurt), the head of British Intelligence, to expose an undercover Sovient agent within MI6’s ranks. His list of suspects include the wily Percy Alleline (Toby Jones), liberal Bill Haydon (Colin Firth), laconic Roy Bland (Ciarán Hinds), reticent Toby Esterhase (David Dencik) and then, of course, Smiley himself. Continue reading “Review: Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy (2011)”

68th Annual Golden Globe Awards: Winners

Best Motion Picture – Drama

  • The Social Network

Best Performance By An Actress In A Motion Picture – Drama

  • Natalie Portman – (Black Swan)

Best Performance By An Actor In A Motion Picture – Drama

  • Colin Firth – (The King’s Speech)

Best Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy

  • The Kids Are All Right

Best Performance By An Actress In A Motion Picture – Musical Or Comedy

  • Annette Bening – (The Kids Are All Right)

Best Performance By An Actor In A Motion Picture – Musical Or Comedy

  • Paul Giamatti – (Barney’s Version)

Best Performance By An Actress In A Supporting Role – Motion Picture

  • Melissa Leo – (The Fighter)

Best Performance By An Actor In A Supporting Role – Motion Picture

  • Christian Bale – (The Fighter)

Best Animated Feature Film

  • Toy Story 3

Best Foreign Language Film

  • In A Better World

Best Director – Motion Picture

  • David Fincher – (The Social Network)

Best Screenplay – Motion Picture

  • The Social Network – (Aaron Sorkin)

Best Original Score – Motion Picture

  • The Social Network – (Trent Reznor & Atticus Ross)

Best Original Song – Motion Picture

  • You Haven’t Seen The Last Of Me – (Burlesque)

16th Annual Critics’ Choice Awards: Winners

Best Film

  • The Social Network

Best Director

  • David Fincher – (The Social Network)

Best Actor

  • Colin Firth – (The King’s Speech)

Best Actress

  • Natalie Portman – (Black Swan)

Best Supporting Actor

  • Christian Bale – (The Fighter)

Best Supporting Actress

  • Melissa Leo – (The Fighter)

Best Young Actor/Actress

  • Hailee Steinfeld – (True Grit)

Best Acting Ensemble

  • The Fighter

Best Original Screenplay

  • The King’s Speech – (David Seidler)

Best Adapted Screenplay

  • The Social Network – (Aaron Sorkin)

Best Cinematography

  • Inception

Best Art Direction

  • Inception

Best Editing

  • Inception

Best Costume Design

  • Alice In Wonderland

Best Makeup

  • Alice In Wonderland

Best Visual Effects

  • Inception

Best Sound

  • Inception

Best Animated Film

  • Toy Story 3

Best Action Film

  • Inception

Best Comedy Film

  • Easy A

Best Film Made For Television

  • The Pacific

Best Foreign Language Film

  • The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo

Best Documentary Film

  • Waiting For Superman

Best Score

  • The Social Network – (Trent Reznor & Atticus Ross)

Best Song

  • If I Rise – (127 Hours)

Review: The King’s Speech (2010)

Tom Hooper returns to the period drama genre with The King’s Speech, a subtly told tale of life-long struggles and friendship, set during the build-up to World War II.

The King’s Speech tells the story of King George VI (Colin Firth) who, after his brother abdicates the throne, reluctantly becomes king. Plagued by a stammer, George and his wife Elizabeth (Helena Bonham Carter) enlist the help of unorthodox speech therapist Lionel Logue (Geoffrey Rush).

From here, as the characters battle through countless speech sessions, comic fights and heartfelt exchanges, the film builds to a excellent, adrenaline-pumping crescendo, George VI’s first war-time speech.

Firth’s performance as King George VI is remarkable. Not only is he able to portray the character with conviction and believability, but he acquires the stammer as though he’s been plagued with it himself his whole life.

Rush and Carter bring comedy to the film, lifting the tone from morbid period drama to a rousing, and uplifting tale, each holding their own opposite the masterful Firth.

Each of the three actors here should be guaranteed plenty of award nominations, in particular Firth, who has again proved himself as one of Britain’s finest actors.

In addition to the three central leads, there is strong support from Timothy Spall as Winston Churchill, Michael Gambon as King George V and Guy Pearce as King Edward VIII.

Hooper handles the material with care and style, producing a clever, humorous and emotional film that will have leave you lost for words.

A must see, by all accounts.