Third And Final Trailer For The Dark Knight Rises

Warner Bros. Pictures have released the third and final trailer for The Dark Knight Rises – one that promises a more dramatic, emotionally resonant entry into the latest, inherently murky Batman franchise.

Written and directed once more by the partnership of Christopher Nolan and Jonathan Nolan, The Dark Knight Rises finds Batman (Christian Bale) hunted by the Police Department after taking the fall for Harvey Dent’s demise. However, Continue reading “Third And Final Trailer For The Dark Knight Rises”

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Review: Contagion (2011)

Returning to her family in Minnesota after a business trip in Hong Kong, Beth Emhoff’s (Gwyneth Paltrow) supposed bad case of jet lag takes a turn for the worse. Suddenly racked with severe seizures, she dies in hospital. However, her mysterious disease quickly begins to spread, forcing researchers from the Centre for Disease Control and the World Health Orginization (Kate Winslet, Lawrence Fishburne, Jennifer Ehle and Marion Cotillard) to face the crisis head on as they work to manage emerging clusters, develop a cure and trace the growing epidemic back to Continue reading “Review: Contagion (2011)”

Review: Midnight In Paris (2011)

Woody Allen’s 41st film, Midnight In Paris is a light-hearted comedy set in the city of love: Paris, marks somewhat of a return to form for the exalted writer-director. Though not without its flaws, it’s a charmingly low-key affair that exudes a certain level of enjoyment that’s been missing since the critically-acclaimed Vicky Cristina Barcelona.

Gil (Owen Wilson), a successful Hollywood script writer experiencing a mid-life crisis, and his fiance, Inez (Rachel McAdams), travel to Paris with Inez’ wealthy, conservative parents. After realising how little in common he has with his prospective family, Gil heads off into Paris alone, where he not only Continue reading “Review: Midnight In Paris (2011)”

Trailer: Midnight In Paris

Director – Woody Allen

Starring – Owen Wilson, Rachel McAdams, Marion Cotillard and Kathy Bates

Poster: Midnight In Paris

Director – Woody Allen

Starring – Owen Wilson, Rachel McAdams, Marion Cotillard and Tom Hiddleston

Review: Inception (2010)

Inception is the latest film from movie mastermind Christopher Nolan. After directing such acclaimed and commercially successful films as Memento, The Dark Knight and The Prestige, Nolan returns to cinema screens with another mind-bending summer blockbuster, this time putting the emphasis on dreams, allowing his action to take place across several layers, or levels as they’re referred to in the film.

Centering on Dom (DiCaprio), a superior “extrator” who’s hired by a businessman, Saito (Watanbe) to carry out an “inception”, which is to plant an idea, that will cause Robert (Murphy) to collapse his fathers (Postlethwaite) company following his death.

For around the first hour of the film we’re introduced to Dom and his efforts to assemble a team to accompany him, which eventually include Arthur (Levitt), Eames (Hardy), Yusef (Rao), and Ariadne (Page) who’s hired by Dom to design the dream they’ll be entering to carry out the “inception”.

Dom’s late wife, Mal (Cotillard), who we’re introduced to early on in the film, flits between the dreams, haunting Dom’s mind as a “projection”. Eventually, we learn the backbone to their story, how she died, and why Dom won’t let her go. Although Cotillard doesn’t have much screentime, she brings a mysterious, almost dreamy quality to Mal’s nature, allowing viewers to understand her position within the narrative.

It’s when we enter the first level that the action really gets going and Nolan’s imagination comes to life. Playing off wondrous specticle and the studios freedom, he concocts a thinking man’s blockbuster, one that will keep you hooked for it’s entirety, leading itself to a memorable, explosive, bewildering, yet assured, ending.

Despite the heavy running time, the film runs smoothly enough, seamlessly gliding along as the team delve through different levels, getting deeper and deeper withing the subconscious in an effort to plant this idea inside Robert’s mind, deep enough for it to stick long after they’ve awoken.

DiCaprio’s performance as Dom carries the film, showing a new side to his superior acting skills, as he inforces Dom’s ideals, while restraining himself somewhat, especially against the action-laded backdrop. Supporting performances from Page, Levitt and, most notably, Hardy are remarkable, hopefully enough to make them stick in critics’ heads come awards season.

In terms of style, it’s truly spectacular to see someone like Nolan’s vision come to life on the big screen. You could spend the whole film marvelling at the set designs, CG effects and cinematography, but it never gets in the way of the film’s purpose. A remarkable feat to behold.

Inception is not only visually impressive but, with a sterling cast, innovative narrative and mind-blowing set-pieces, also a winning cinematic experience all-round. Worth entering with an open mind.