Review: Snowden (2016)

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Oliver Stone directs this subpar biopic about Edward Snowden, the infamous NSA contractor who leaked top secret information about surveillance. Framed with scenes from Hong Kong in the days leading up to the exposé, the script – co-written by Stone and Kieran Fitzgerald – uses flashbacks to track Snowden’s career from model student to criminal. Continue reading “Review: Snowden (2016)”

Review: Lincoln (2013)

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Lincoln, based in part on Doris Kearns Goodwin’s Team Of Rivals: The Political Genius Of Abraham Lincoln, sees director Steven Spielberg dramatising the 16th President of the United States’ final few months in office to varied results. In 1865, as the American Civil War nears its conclusion after four years of bloody combat, Abraham Lincoln (Daniel Day-Lewis) takes it upon himself to pass the landmark constitutional amendment and rid America of slavery: the main reason Continue reading “Review: Lincoln (2013)”

Joseph Gordon-Levitt Brings The Cool To Looper

When he turned 7-years-old, Joseph Gordon-Levitt landed his first role in television film Stranger On My Land, starring opposite Tommy Lee Jones. In the years that followed, he enjoyed limited, yet sustained success with roles in such well-known TV series’ as Murder, She Wrote, Dark Shadows and Quantum Leap, building up a strong portfolio and an honest passion for his art. It was his role as the awkward, yet unchaste Tommy Solomons in 3rd Rock From The Sun Continue reading “Joseph Gordon-Levitt Brings The Cool To Looper”

Review: Looper (2012)

In the year 2044, Joe (Joseph Gordon-Levitt) works as a contract killer – or “Looper” – for a mysterious figure known as the Rainmaker, who exists in a future in which time travel has been invented. Joe’s job is to kill those sent back from the future and dispose of their bodies, ultimately destroying any evidence of their existence. However, when he’s ordered by his boss Abe (Jeff Daniels) to kill his future self (Bruce Willis) and “close his loop”, he chokes, giving his older Continue reading “Review: Looper (2012)”

Review: The Dark Knight Rises (2012)

Eight years after the grisly events that resulted in the death of Harvey Dent, Batman is nowhere to be seen and the city of Gotham has become a place of peace and mutual co-operation under the Dent Act. However, when a ruthless madman named Bane (Tom Hardy) rises from the darkest depths of the world and begins to take advantage of the city’s new-found order, Bruce Wayne (Christian Bale) is forced to call upon Wayne Enterprises’ virtuoso Lucius Fox (Morgan Freeman), Continue reading “Review: The Dark Knight Rises (2012)”

Third And Final Trailer For The Dark Knight Rises

Warner Bros. Pictures have released the third and final trailer for The Dark Knight Rises – one that promises a more dramatic, emotionally resonant entry into the latest, inherently murky Batman franchise.

Written and directed once more by the partnership of Christopher Nolan and Jonathan Nolan, The Dark Knight Rises finds Batman (Christian Bale) hunted by the Police Department after taking the fall for Harvey Dent’s demise. However, Continue reading “Third And Final Trailer For The Dark Knight Rises”

Julianne Moore And Scarlett Johansson To Star In Joseph Gordon Levitt’s Directorial Debut

Julianne Moore (The Kids Are All Right) and Scarlett Johansson (Lost In Translation) have signed on to star in fellow actor Joseph Gordon Levitt’s directorial debut, The Playlist is reporting.

The actor, known for his roles in Inception and 500 Days Of Summer, will direct the as-yet-untitled film  – about a modern day Don Juan character who sets out to better himself as a person – from a script he wrote himself.

Moore, who received praise for her turn as Sarah Palin in HBO’s Game Change Continue reading “Julianne Moore And Scarlett Johansson To Star In Joseph Gordon Levitt’s Directorial Debut”

Review: 50/50 (2011)

Adam (Joseph Gordon-Levitt), a 27-year-old radio employee, is abruptly diagnosed with a very rare, life-threatening form of spinal cancer. Unable to turn to his self-obsessed girlfriend (Bryce Dallas Howard) or domineering mother (Anjelica Huston) for help, he instead finds resolution with his oafish best friend (Seth Rogen) and novice therapist (Anna Kendrick).

It’s a rare feat for a film about cancer to be both funny and deeply moving in equal measure, but that’s exactly what makes 50/50 so distinctive. It’s Continue reading “Review: 50/50 (2011)”

Trailer: Hesher

Director: Spencer Susser

Starring: Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Natalie Portman, Rainn Wilson and Devin Brochu

Review: Inception (2010)

Inception is the latest film from movie mastermind Christopher Nolan. After directing such acclaimed and commercially successful films as Memento, The Dark Knight and The Prestige, Nolan returns to cinema screens with another mind-bending summer blockbuster, this time putting the emphasis on dreams, allowing his action to take place across several layers, or levels as they’re referred to in the film.

Centering on Dom (DiCaprio), a superior “extrator” who’s hired by a businessman, Saito (Watanbe) to carry out an “inception”, which is to plant an idea, that will cause Robert (Murphy) to collapse his fathers (Postlethwaite) company following his death.

For around the first hour of the film we’re introduced to Dom and his efforts to assemble a team to accompany him, which eventually include Arthur (Levitt), Eames (Hardy), Yusef (Rao), and Ariadne (Page) who’s hired by Dom to design the dream they’ll be entering to carry out the “inception”.

Dom’s late wife, Mal (Cotillard), who we’re introduced to early on in the film, flits between the dreams, haunting Dom’s mind as a “projection”. Eventually, we learn the backbone to their story, how she died, and why Dom won’t let her go. Although Cotillard doesn’t have much screentime, she brings a mysterious, almost dreamy quality to Mal’s nature, allowing viewers to understand her position within the narrative.

It’s when we enter the first level that the action really gets going and Nolan’s imagination comes to life. Playing off wondrous specticle and the studios freedom, he concocts a thinking man’s blockbuster, one that will keep you hooked for it’s entirety, leading itself to a memorable, explosive, bewildering, yet assured, ending.

Despite the heavy running time, the film runs smoothly enough, seamlessly gliding along as the team delve through different levels, getting deeper and deeper withing the subconscious in an effort to plant this idea inside Robert’s mind, deep enough for it to stick long after they’ve awoken.

DiCaprio’s performance as Dom carries the film, showing a new side to his superior acting skills, as he inforces Dom’s ideals, while restraining himself somewhat, especially against the action-laded backdrop. Supporting performances from Page, Levitt and, most notably, Hardy are remarkable, hopefully enough to make them stick in critics’ heads come awards season.

In terms of style, it’s truly spectacular to see someone like Nolan’s vision come to life on the big screen. You could spend the whole film marvelling at the set designs, CG effects and cinematography, but it never gets in the way of the film’s purpose. A remarkable feat to behold.

Inception is not only visually impressive but, with a sterling cast, innovative narrative and mind-blowing set-pieces, also a winning cinematic experience all-round. Worth entering with an open mind.