69th Edinburgh International Film Festival Wrap-Up

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For the fifth year in a row, I made my way to the Edinburgh International Film Festival, armed with my press pass and a hunger to see what this year’s crop of films had to offer. And, all in all, it was a strong year. There were many highlights, including Inside Out, which restored the festivals long-standing relationship with Pixar, and 45 Years, writer-director Andrew Haigh’s follow-up to Weekend. Continue reading “69th Edinburgh International Film Festival Wrap-Up”

EIFF15 Review: 45 Years (2015)

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A long-standing relationship is put under severe pressure by past revelations in 45 Years, writer-director Andrew Haigh’s tragic, yet masterful follow-up to the acclaimed Weekend. Days before their forty fifth wedding anniversary celebrations are due to take place, Geoff (Tom Courteney) receives an unexpected letter that drags up suppressed feelings, leaving Kate (Charlotte Rampling) out in the cold as feelings of envy and exile steadily consume her. Continue reading “EIFF15 Review: 45 Years (2015)”

EIFF15 Review: Inside Out (2015)

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Returning after a year long absence, Pixar hit a home run with Inside Out, an enormously insightful and entertaining animation chock full of heart, humour and verve. Riley finds her life turned upside down when she moves to San Fransisco. Her emotions – Joy, Sadness, Anger, Fear and Disgust – do their best to see her through, which is easier said than done. Continue reading “EIFF15 Review: Inside Out (2015)”

2013 In Review: Top Ten Films

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2013 was a fantastic year for film. It’s as simple as that. Technological boundaries were broken, Disney made a triumphant comeback with not one but two wonderful animated releases, Noah Baumbach proved what could happen when you make a film on a shoestring budget and in black-and-white, and Steven Soderbergh bid a fond farewell to the cinematic world with the fantastic one-two punch of pharmaceutical drama Side Effects and outlandish Liberace biopic Behind The Candelabra. Continue reading “2013 In Review: Top Ten Films”

2013 In Film: A Summary

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2013 has brought with it a lot of things, both good and bad. But in this particular post I’ll be focusing on the film-related highlights that I’ve experienced over the past twelve months, from a mini adventure in London that included my first ever podcast appearance to a wine-soaked preview screening of Gravity at the newly converted IMAX cinema in Glasgow. I’ve interviewed idols, attended film festivals, and even walked a red carpet. Continue reading “2013 In Film: A Summary”

Review: Not Another Happy Ending (2013)

Not Another Happy Ending

John McKay’s Not Another Happy Ending is a breezy and harmless if ultimately forgettable romantic comedy set in and around the city of Glasgow. Jane (former Doctor Who star Karen Gillan), a struggling novelist, finds herself thrust into the limelight when her first novel, a memoir about the trails of her own family, becomes an overnight success. With her newfound status, her life sees improvement. Not only does she fall in love with screenwriter Willie (Henry Ian Cusick), but she also starts to reconnect with her estranged father. Continue reading “Review: Not Another Happy Ending (2013)”

EIFF 2013 Review: This Is Martin Bonner (2013)

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Writer-director Chad Hartigan follows up his softly received directorial debut Luke And Brie Are On A First Date with This Is Martin Bonner, a thoughtful, well-acted and subtle character drama that scooped the Best of NEXT Audience Award at this year’s Sundance Film Festival. It’s minimalist and quiet, sure, but that’s what enables this film about two elderly men experiencing dramatic changes in their lives to be such a welcome surprise and linger in the mind long after the end credits roll. Continue reading “EIFF 2013 Review: This Is Martin Bonner (2013)”

EIFF 2013 Review: Monsters University (2013)

Monsters University

Disney•Pixar continue their long-standing tradition of unveiling their new films at the Edinburgh International Film Festival with Monsters University. The prequel to Monsters, Inc., Monsters University bears the unfortunate task of being a sequel to one of the studios most adored, original and hugely successful efforts. And, while it sadly never reaches the heights of its predecessor in terms of intelligence and ingenuity, it’ll win audiences over nonetheless with its abundant charm and wit. Continue reading “EIFF 2013 Review: Monsters University (2013)”

EIFF 2013 Review: Stories We Tell (2012)

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Actress-turned-director Sarah Polley turns her attention away from death and adultery as surveyed through her previous two narrative features Away From Her and Take This Waltz and onto her family history with unconventional documentary Stories We Tell. Using her talent as both a filmmaker and as a storyteller to tell her family’s story may seem self-indulgent and unnecessary to be aired in public, yet the warmth in which Polley infuses into the film ensures it carries with it a more deeper, universal value. Continue reading “EIFF 2013 Review: Stories We Tell (2012)”

EIFF 2013 Review: For Those In Peril (2013)

For Those In Peril

The Edinburgh International Film Festival has forever prided itself as a festival of discovery, a platform for new filmmaking talent to present their works to audiences, critics and fellow filmmakers alike in the hope of receiving recognition. If there’s one person who deserves credit this year, then it’s Paul Wright, whose feature debut For Those In Peril is a bold and innovative poetic fable that, through a rich textual narrative, astounds in its emotional resonance. Continue reading “EIFF 2013 Review: For Those In Peril (2013)”