GFF 2013 Review: Arbitrage (2013)

Arbitrage

Nicholas Jarecki directs Richard Gere in Arbitrage, a competent political thriller about how wealth and power often change people for the worse, regardless of who or what damage and pain this course of action inflicts on those close to them. It’s an intriguing, timely story, yet somehow lacks the necessary bite and emotional core to engage its audience and mask the many inconsistencies contained within Jarecki’s script. Continue reading “GFF 2013 Review: Arbitrage (2013)”

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Why I Must See The Paperboy

The Paperboy

The Paperboy hasn’t exactly had the best life, yet it’s become all the more appealing because of it. Adapted from Pete Dexter’s 1995 novel of the same name by director Lee Daniels and Dexter himself, The Paperboy centres on Wade Jansen (Matthew McConaughey), a reporter who returns to his Florida hometown in order to investigate a murder case involving death row inmate, Hillary Van Wetter (John Cusack). Continue reading “Why I Must See The Paperboy”

London Day #6: Weariness, Glasgow Film Festival Launch And My Own Bed

MPC

The final day in London had arrived. I woke up at nine o’clock, packed and was all checked-out in no time. With my suitcase, laptop bag and satchel I took some last minute pictures of the area I’d spent the last few days calling my “home” (it was actually a lovely area, despite the fact an entire office block full of people had seen me naked and there was always a sense of dread coursing through my body as I walked to and from the tube station) and clambered down the escalators and onto the Northern Line.  Continue reading “London Day #6: Weariness, Glasgow Film Festival Launch And My Own Bed”

London Day #4: Krispy Kreme Breakfast, Zero Dark Thirty And Compliments

Krispy Kreme

After a night of maniacs and nearly freezing to death, I opted to miss the first two films (one of which I’d already seen) and have an extra couple of hours in bed. It was an altogether more relaxed morning and, once I was ready, I slowly made my way across to the tube station and caught the usual mix of the Northern Line and the Piccadilly Line over to Holborn Street, where I dived into Krispy Kreme and ordered a tea and three enormous donuts, each filled with different, yet equally Continue reading “London Day #4: Krispy Kreme Breakfast, Zero Dark Thirty And Compliments”

London Day #2: Tube Ease, UK Media Showcase Kick-Off And Hunger Strikes

London Underground

Waking up on the Sunday morning was surreal. Not only was I in London, but I’d also had the best night’s sleep in weeks. I took a moment to appreciate my peaceful surroundings before I bumbled around getting ready and gathering up everything I’d need for the day ahead, which wasn’t much considering I’d be spending the vast majority of it stationed in the Apollo cinema. Continue reading “London Day #2: Tube Ease, UK Media Showcase Kick-Off And Hunger Strikes”

Interview With The Monk Director Dominik Moll

As of last Friday, The Monk, the latest adaptation of Matthew Lewis’ revered and controversial eighteenth-century novel, made its way into select cinemas across the U.K.

The film, co-written and directed by Dominik Moll, centers on Ambrosio (Vincent Cassel), an acclaimed monk who, after becoming entranced by a masked figure (Déborah François) who takes shelter in the monastery, is lead down a Continue reading “Interview With The Monk Director Dominik Moll”

U.K. Trailer For The Raid Crashes Online

Momentum Pictures have done it. They’ve defied adversity and created a trailer for The Raid that not only makes this writer want to relive it as soon as possible, but manages to capture its spirited heart and soul in a brief, one and a half minute window.

Written and directed by Welsh-born filmmaker Gareth Evans (Merantau), The Raid hinges on a fairly straightforward conceit: a SWAT team enter a tenement block in an effort to bring down Tama (Ray Sahatapy), a ruthless Continue reading “U.K. Trailer For The Raid Crashes Online”

Review: The Kid With A Bike (2011)

Disregarded by his father (Jérémie Renier) for no apparent reason, Cyril (Thomas Doret) longs for a normal childhood and to escape the children’s home he’s been placed in. He sees a new opportunity when he happens upon friendly mother figure Samantha (Cécilie De France), who agrees to take care of him on weekends, but his turbulent past leaves him unsure how to handle his emotions and new found security.

Slight, yes, but that’s what makes The Kid With A Bike such a tender, heart-warming and true-to-life depiction of the innocence of childhood and one child’s Continue reading “Review: The Kid With A Bike (2011)”

Review: Trishna (2011)

While in India managing a hotel, Jay (Riz Ahmed) meets Trishna (Freida Pinto), a soft-spoken, hard-working young woman living in one of the country’s poorest areas. In a bid to spend more time with her, and improve her situation, Jay invites Trishna to work at his hotel. As they spend more and more time together, their feelings develop and the opportunity to relocate to Mumbai becomes irresistible. However, when Jay’s father (Roshan Seth) suffers a heart attack and they’re forced back to where they started, they discover that their relationship isn’t exactly as it appears.

Adapted from Thomas Hardy’s Tess of the D’Urbervilles, Trishna sees the well known story relocated. The changes accentuate not only the novel’s main theme – Continue reading “Review: Trishna (2011)”

Review: Bel Ami (2012)

Georges Duroy (Robert Pattinson) is a peasant. Finding himself in Paris, he’s taken under the wing of old friend Charles Forestier (Philip Glenister), who lands him employment as a political writer and introduces him to three high society ladies: his wife Madeleine Forestier (Uma Thurman), Virginie Walters (Kristen Scott Thomas) and Clotilde De Marelle (Christina Ricci). Through means of seduction, betrayal and deception, Georges slowly rises from poverty to wealth, but it all comes at a price.

The concept of one man’s elevation to wealth and power through any means necessary is a fascinating one, and, perhaps with a screenwriter more attuned Continue reading “Review: Bel Ami (2012)”